Chile - Empanadas de Horno

Despite including olives (not a fan), the filling was insanely good. The dough, flaky. NO SOGGY BOTTOMS! However, the bf and I both agreed it needed some sort of hot sauce or salsa to accompany the empanada. I cheated and used a bowl as my stencil LOL, not sorry. I also thought I overstuffed them, but turns out, the dough still stretched when I tried to seal them, so overstuffing wasn’t an issue!

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Netherlands - Dutch Stamppot

This dish isn’t anything “special” in the sense that it’s a pretty easy dish to make. But the combination of flavors is definitely a good one. It kind of comes off as an elevated poor man’s dish - potatoes and sausage - but the addition of endives (or kale) and drizzled with gravy gives this poor man’s dish a great twist.

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Germany - Schnitzel

I made schnitzel some time ago when we were still living in Chicago. We had a few friends over for Oktoberfest celebrations. Delicious beers and schnitzel. We made a lot, so naturally we had leftovers. Being from Eastern Europe, I grew up with this stuff and let me tell you, there are at least 4 different ways I can think of to eat this fried pork.

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Botswana - Seswaa

The shredded beef literally uses 5 ingredients, 6 if you count water. It’s insanely easy to make, however it’s a pain in the ass waiting for it to cook. Four hours baking in the oven in low heat, and another hour simmering on the stove waiting to reduce the liquids. But this results in an amazingly tender beef that falls apart by simply a touch.

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Jordan - Mansaf

I was a bit worried going into this that the lamb would not taste like anything or that it would be too tough. Little did I know... little. Did. I. Know. It was actually so flavorful and tender. And went perfectly with the saffron rice. The tip I’ve always read, don’t overdo the saffron. A little goes a long way. The rice tasted so beautifully.

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Mongolia - Guriltai Shul

Guriltai Shul uses far fewer ingredients than most soups I’ve made, but packs a LOT of flavor. The broth is made purely out of simmering lamb, with the addition of root vegetables. Mongolian foods typically don’t rely on a lot of spices because of the economical climate of the country, but the result of relying solely on ingredients makes this a very delicious and light soup.

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