Mongolia - Guriltai Shul

mongolia-guriltai-shul
mongolia-guriltai-shul

Guriltai Shul uses far fewer ingredients than most soups I’ve made, but packs a LOT of flavor. The broth is made purely out of simmering lamb, with the addition of sliced onion and carrots. Mongolian foods typically don’t rely on a lot of spices because of the economical climate of the country, so I tried to rely on more natural flavors rather than adding a bunch of herbs and spices.

I REALLY contemplated doing Mongolian beef for a very long time, but it’s not technically Mongolian from sources I’ve read. Also, the point of WNTW isn’t to make dishes I’m comfortable doing. It’s to learn new things and try new foods.

The broth was incredibly light but flavorful. There are a few things I would do next time though. Instead of also simmering the lamb meat, I would sear it, and only simmer the bones. I would also sear the bones before simmering. Otherwise, not much else was needed to make this a delicious and light lunch.


Ingredients

  • Oil

  • 2 onions, sliced

  • 1 1/2 pounds lamb, cut into thin slices

  • 1 turnip, diced

  • 2 carrot, diced

  • 1 tablespoon beef bouillon

  • 8-10 cups water

  • 1 package flat noodles, fresh or fried

Instructions

  1. In a pot over medium-high heat, add oil. When it starts to shimmer, add the onions and sauté until soft and translucent, about 4-5 minutes.

    • Note: If using whole pieces of lamb, I’d recommend actually searing the lamb first to brown. Set the lamb aside to slice, and then continue to frying the onions in the lamb fats.

  2. Add the diced turnips and carrots to the pot and sauté for about 3 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, and the bouillon, and add the lamb back into the pot.

  3. Add the water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let it simmer, covered, for about 30 minutes.

  4. Add the noodles, and boil until they are soft and ready, about 5 minutes. Serve and enjoy!

    • You can also prepare the noodles separately per package instructions, and fry them in oil after. Serve in a bowl and pour the broth on top.

    • I’d also recommend buying pre-sliced lamb, like the kind you would use for hot pot or pho, even though I highly recommend using bones for any sort of broths. Thinly sliced meats just look nicer in soup.

Recipe adapted from Mongol Foods.

Print the recipe
 I’m a huge fan of traveling, and an even bigger fan of eating. Have you ever had street food in Taiwan? Or fried cheese with fries at a local tavern in Slovakia? Well, join me each week as I attempt to make a dish from every country in the world.  What country would you like to see next? Let me know in the comments!

I’m a huge fan of traveling, and an even bigger fan of eating. Have you ever had street food in Taiwan? Or fried cheese with fries at a local tavern in Slovakia? Well, join me each week as I attempt to make a dish from every country in the world.

What country would you like to see next? Let me know in the comments!


Recent Recipes