Netherlands - Dutch Stamppot

netherlands-dutch-stamppot
netherlands-dutch-stamppot

This was a dish that actually kind of reminds me of growing up. Not necessarily the combination of protein and carbs, but the potatoes and dill pickles. What’s funny is that I hated potatoes and onions together and would always have to drown it with something, such as ketchup or gravy. But now I love it. Caramelized onions make everything taste better. Want to be healthy? Add kale.

The sausage, unless you’re making it yourself or going to a butcher, is never going to be anything special if you buy it from your standard grocery store. But overall, it’s a solid meal and definitely reminds me of those heavy Eastern European type dishes.

A lot of photos I see online of this dish show the mashed potatoes pretty green. I was wondering why mine weren’t quite as green, and it’s actually because I used endives in my dish rather than kale. I read that endives are more traditional vegetable to add, yet everyone uses kale for some reason. In addition to the childhood potatoes I remember, this dish also reminds me a little bit of dirty mashed potatoes, with bacon and onions.

And for a more special, unhealthy treat, make gravy instead of using olive oil for the final drizzle. More flavor!


Ingredients

  • 5 russet potatoes, chopped

  • Salt and pepper

  • 2 tablespoons butter

  • 1/2 cup milk

  • Olive oil

  • 1 yellow onion, finely chopped

  • 2 garlic cloves, minced

  • 1 pound endives, chopped (sub 1 bunch kale)

  • 1/4 cup water

  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar

  • 1 pound smoked pork sausage, either sliced or cut in half

  • 4 scallions or parsley, chopped for garnish

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, add the potatoes, a dash of salt, and water. Bring to a boil. Reduce the water to a simmer, cover and cook until tender, about 10-15 minutes; more if you boil them whole or in quarters. Drain the water, but make sure to reserve about 1 cup of it for later. 

  2. Add the potatoes back to the pot (or a separate mixing bowl), and add the butter, milk, salt and pepper. Mash them to your desired consistency. If you want the potatoes to be creamier, feel free to add the potato water, little by little. 

  3. If you aren’t storing the potatoes in the pot, feel free to use it for the next step. Add 2 tablespoons of oil and set the heat to medium-low. Add the onions and cook until translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and give it a good stir. Reduce the heat to medium.
    Next, add the kale, 1/4 cup of water, and the white wine vinegar. Cover the pot, and let the kale wilt for about 2-3 minutes. Remove the lid and stir frequently for an additional 4 minutes. Less if the kale seems to be tender before that. Season with salt and black pepper. Add the kale mixture to the potatoes, and stir until well combined.

  4. Now, add oil to the same pot you just used, but this time, cook the sausages on all sides until nicely seared and cooked all the way through. The packaging should give you a good estimate of total time required.

    • Note: instead of drizzling the final product with olive oil, you can add a little flour to the grease in the pot, along with a little bit of water to make a delicious gravy. 

  5. Give yourself a serving of the mashed potato mixture on a plate or bowl, and top with the sausages. Drizzle a little olive oil and garnish with scallions or parsley. Serve with a side of baby dill pickles. Growing up, my mom would serve these kinds of dishes with baby dill pickles so it just goes together naturally for me.

Recipe adapted from Panning the Globe. 

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I’m a huge fan of traveling, and an even bigger fan of eating. Have you ever had street food in Taiwan? Or fried cheese with fries at a local tavern in Slovakia? Well, join me each week as I attempt to make a dish from every country in the world.  What country would you like to see next? Let me know in the comments!

I’m a huge fan of traveling, and an even bigger fan of eating. Have you ever had street food in Taiwan? Or fried cheese with fries at a local tavern in Slovakia? Well, join me each week as I attempt to make a dish from every country in the world.

What country would you like to see next? Let me know in the comments!


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